Components of a Comprehensive Electronic Security System

Components of a Comprehensive Electronic Security System

Does your facility’s electronic security system monitor for external and internal threats?

An electronic security system comprises of electronic equipment used to secure a building. These systems are widely used at government facilities, commercial properties, shopping centers, hospitals, transit stations, higher education institutions, and residential areas. While much of today’s technology and issues centers around data and network security, the physical location of facilities must be well-protected too. Intruders at sites holding sensitive information, such as data centers, pose a significant security breach. Additionally, there are harmful risks within facilities if security systems aren’t in place. So, what are the different components of a comprehensive electronic security system your building needs to have in place to detect and deter threats?

Surveillance System

Many buildings that use video surveillance have CCTV systems. CCTV, or closed-circuit television, rely on camera footage to monitor a facility for suspicious activity. With a closed-circuit system, the recorded footage and data is stored and streamed to a secure access place for review.

In general, security cameras are visible intruder deterring tools. It’s easier to quickly and accurately investigate security breaches. Not only does this make recovering damages more likely, electronic security systems using video surveillance enables more immediate or proactive responses to any perceived threats.

Access Control System

Access control systems are a standard component of any secure facility’s structure. When humans are both the facilitator and potentially the physical threat to building security, managing who can go where is of utmost importance. Access control systems vet employee and visitor credentials for both authentication and authorization. Limited and conditional access to parts of a building safeguards from external and internal threats to a facility. Monitoring a property for strange or suspicious access activity could indicate whether there is an intentional or nonintentional security violation. 

Intrusion Detection System

Lastly, a comprehensive electronic security system should have an intrusion detection system in place. Cameras, sensors, and locks are some of the parts that make up a property intrusion detection system. These components installed throughout a facility detect more than just trespassers. Some detection systems  alert building personnel of other hazards like fires, water leaks, open windows, and open doors, or strange activity around the building perimeter. Many facilities set up their detection system to also send alerts to their security company. 

Electronic Security System for Individual Needs

Depending on a building’s purpose, different components of the security system get adjusted for its unique needs. While having one of these components in place is better than none at all, comprehensive protection comes from integrating the security information from each system. Monitoring human activity using video surveillance, access records, and alerts of suspicious activity better inform building personnel of facility threats, and in turn, how to react to those threats.

CONTACT CRITICAL SYSTEMS TODAY!

At Critical Systems, the people come first, from our employees to our customers. We strive to attract and develop the best talent in the business. Our goal is to deliver innovative solutions for the purpose of making every building secure, efficient, and effectively managed. Serving the Washington D.C., Northern Virginia, and Baltimore regions, SEBCSI provides innovative solutions for your commercial building or facility. Visit our website and follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and LinkedIn today! If you’re looking for more information or interested in working with us on your next project, please contact us!

This entry was posted on Monday, November 11th, 2019 at 10:56 am. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.